Rolling back time

 

There are many situations where you want to roll the date back – checking a file’s last access time, processing event logs, checking a password expiry in AD.

Get-Date (or more accurately the underlying System.DateTime .NET class offers a number of options.

Lets say you need a date that’s 3 months in the past. 

You could create it directly:

£> Get-Date -Day 26 -Month 6 -Year 2013

26 June 2013 19:41:42

Alternatively:

£> Get-Date -Date “26 June 2013”

26 June 2013 00:00:00

Notice the difference on the times.  I’m going to ignore the time portion.

Get-Date supplies a number of methods you could use:

Get-Date | Get-Member -MemberType Method

Add
AddDays
AddHours
AddMilliseconds
AddMinutes
AddMonths
AddSeconds
AddTicks
AddYears

£> $ts = New-TimeSpan -Days 91
£> $ts

Days              : 91
Hours             : 0
Minutes           : 0
Seconds           : 0
Milliseconds      : 0
Ticks             : 78624000000000
TotalDays         : 91
TotalHours        : 2184
TotalMinutes      : 131040
TotalSeconds      : 7862400
TotalMilliseconds : 7862400000

 

£> (Get-Date).Add(-$ts)

27 June 2013 19:46:06

£> (Get-Date).AddDays(-$ts.Totaldays)

27 June 2013 19:46:32

£> (Get-Date).AddHours(-$ts.TotalHours)

27 June 2013 19:48:32

£> (Get-Date).AddMinutes(-$ts.TotalMinutes)

27 June 2013 19:49:07

£> (Get-Date).AddSeconds(-$ts.TotalSeconds)

27 June 2013 19:50:18

£> (Get-Date).AddMilliseconds(-$total.TotalMilliseconds)

26 September 2013 19:51:19

£> (Get-Date).AddTicks(-$total.TotalTicks)

26 September 2013 19:51:38

 

You can also do

£> (Get-Date).AddMonths(-3)

26 June 2013 19:52:12

£> (Get-Date).AddYears(-0.25)

26 September 2013 19:52:37

Lots of ways to solve the same problem. While you normally wouldn’t want to calculate a date 3 months in the past based on seconds or ticks the fact that you can use those values opens up other possibilities.

The [datetime] class supplies a good set of methods for manipulating dates. Knowing they are there enables you to use the most appropriate to solve your task.

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